Shindig! Broadcast #41

JON ‘MOJO’ MILLS goes it alone as the Soho Radio team were broadcasting from Bestival. Recorded at home, featuring a selection of issue #71 related stuff and a few personal faves.


  1. Normal intro into Soho Radio into The Tremeloes ‘Instant Whip’
  2. Pentangle ‘Light Flight’
  3. Colorama ‘Give It A Miss’
  4. Russel Morris ‘The Real Thing’
  5. The Puppy ‘Belinda’
  6. Coven ‘For Unlawful Carnal Knowledge’
  7. Captain Beefheart ‘Zig Zag Wanderer’
  8. Calliope ‘I Wanna Thank You’
  9. The Lost ‘Violet Gown’
  10. Solar Flares ‘Hold Your Head Up’
  11. PP Arnold ‘A Likely Piece Of Work’
  12. The Clientele ‘Lunar Days’
  13. The Rolling Stones ‘Citadel’
  14. The Rolling Stones ‘2000 Light Years From Home’
  15. The Rolling Stones ‘Child Of The Moon’
  16. The Rolling Stones ‘Acid In The Grass’
  17. The Xtreems ‘Facts Of Life’
  18. The Beginners Mynd ‘Unity’
  19. Lesley Duncan ‘A Road To Nowhere’
  20. Keith Christmas ‘Travelling Down’
  21. The Virgin Sleep ‘Comes A Time’
  22. Fargo ‘Talks We Used To Have’
  23. Esther Phillips ‘Home Is Where The Hatred Is’
  24. The Undisputed Truth ‘Feelin’ Alright’
  25. Blue Beard ‘Sly Willy’
  26. Balls ‘Hound Dog Howling’
  27. Rare Bird ‘Devil’s High Concern’
  28. Arthur Brown & Kingdom Come ‘Triangles’
  29. Colin Blunstone ‘Smokey Days’
  30. Gilroy Mere ‘Cuckoo Waltz’
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Tracy Bryant ‘A Place For Nothing And Everything In It’s Place’ premiere

LA based musician TRACY BRYANT, as a one of a kind solo artist, is speaking out as an outstanding singer/songwriter who isn͛t afraid to dig below the surface. With his work he is filling the gap between lush pop-arrangements and a genuine, distinctive sound. To introduce his new album A Place for Nothing And Everything In Its Place (out on Burger Records October 20th) he will head over to Europe and the UK for a month long tour in December joined by his European backing band of Brian Allen on bass, Nick Winfrey (Adult Books) on second guitar and Leonard Kaage (Jawbones, Anton Newcombe & Tess Parks) on drums



‘A Place for Nothing And Everything In Its Place’ was recorded in early 2016 in Berlin, Germany. Originally conceived to be an introspective acoustic album, the written songs, once in the studio, developed into a fullyarranged, conceptual work. With the help of producer Leonard Kaage, the acoustic intention became the red line that guides the nine songs through their variety. Bryant’s lyrics go a more personal way and follow inner and outer conflicts captured through the words of a restless outsider who ends up finding the company of love. The album is filled with dreamy footnotes of piano, ’60s percussion and a more than once appearance of edgy guitars. Imagine a classic singer/songwriter record loaded with the intimacy and grit reminiscent of Alex Chilton or Nikki Sudden. A true milestone that marks an important progression in Bryant͛s career as a solo artist. The album got its finishing touch by the mastering of LA pioneer Dave Cooley (Ariel Pink, The Black Angels, M83).


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Daniel Carlson ‘Cloudy People’ premiere

In the making of DAN CARLSON’s fourth album Not A Drawing and arguably a future classic it is worth noting the thought process behind the making of something that, in an age of very transient and mass produced “art”, is a wholly refreshing approach, whereupon every detail is painstakingly managed in accordance with the creation of something valuable to cherish


Daniel says, “Initially, I was going to work with the same crew as Me You You Me (all LA session dudes – all amazing musicians). But, once I got done with what I thought were the demos, it was clear to me that they had a feel that was worth keeping. So then I thought that maybe I’d go out to LA and do some overdub sessions with those guys, but by the time I had time to do it, the songs had evolved even further. At that point, I decided that I’d finish it up in NYC and reached out to famed producer Michael Leonhart to see about him helping me finish, but it didn’t look like he’d have time in the near future. However, we did spend an afternoon listening to what I had and he had a key piece of advice: “less Paul McCartney, more Pink Floyd,” which was where I’d wanted to go anyway (more synths, more dreaminess). Then there was the Gizmotron. When I was a kid in the late ’70s, the local guitar store sold this mysterious device called a Gizmotron. Was totally cool – fit over the strings of the guitar (close to the bridge) and produced a bowing (instead of a picking) sound.  Kind of like an early eBow. And that was the only knowledge I had of it (it wasn’t sold for long) until years later, when I learned it had been invented by Godley & Creme (of 10cc fame) and used on their records and so I heard it in that context. Then, last year, I found out that someone had re-introduced it as the Gizmotron 2.0 and I immediately got one and used it extensively on the record.”

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