10 Of The Best: Buffalo Springfield Covers

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The sainted quintet of Stephen Stills, Neil Young, Richie Furay, Dewey Martin and Bruce Palmer may have existed for barely two years but their influence, even at the time, was enormous, far outstripping their not inconsiderable commercial success.

Boasting three hugely talented singer-songwriters, it was no surprise that their material was quickly seized by a wide range of acts looking to bask in the Springfield’s reflected glory. Here, we present 10 of our favourite contemporary interpretations of their songs.


1. Sergio Mendes & Brasil ’66 – For What It’s Worth (1970)

Supremely funky take of Stills’ rallying cry from the final Brasil ’66 album, 1970’s Stillness. Dozens of acts have covered the Springfield’s signature tune.

2. The Mojo Men – Sit Down I Think I Love You (1967)

The San Fran folk-rockers took their jaunty arrangement of Stills’ first Springfield album highlight into the US Top 40 with a little help from Van Dyke Parks.

3. Fever Tree – Nowadays Clancy Can’t Even Sing (1968)

The Springfield’s Neil Young-penned debut 45 gets a sophisticated makeover from the Texan psych-rockers.

4. Poco – Go And Say Goodbye (1972)

Richie Furay revisited another Stills gem from the first Springfield album for his subsequent band’s fourth outing.

5. Friar Tuck & The Monks – Mr Soul (1969)

This obscure Kansas garage-rock sextet give Neil Young’s much-covered Buffalo Springfield Again opener a right good kicking. Not released until 2004.

6. The Beach Boys – Rock ’n’ Roll Woman (not recorded)

The BBs were clearly influenced by the support band on their late ’67/early ’68 US tour. Sadly, no Strawberry Alarmclock covers were forthcoming.

7. Neil MacArthur – Hung Upside Down (1969)

Colin Blunstone’s short-lived alter ego turns in a suitably tasteful reading of this Buffalo Springfield Again track, only for it to languish in the vaults for 40 years.

8. Yes – Everydays (1970)

The Brit art-rockers covered The Beatles and The Byrds on their debut and this quiet-loud extemporisation on Stills’ jazzy Again offering is a highlight of their follow-up, Time And A Word.

9. Gabor Szabo – Pretty Girl Why (1970)

Hungarian guitar genius Szabo was no stranger to arranging pop and rock curios to suit himself, as this version of Stills’ Last Time Around Latin-pop gem attests.

10. Percy Sledge – Kind Woman (1969)

The recently departed soul legend breathes deep into Richie Furay’s Last Time Around country-rock tear-jerker.


 

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